The Greatest Hits from The Girl Who Reads

What stories touched you this year? Which stories of your own are you glad you shared?

I had not anticipated doing a “Greatest Hits of 2015” – my own and others. But the idea appeals to me, because I am a Girl Who Reads.

Stories By Others:

1) The Mixed Up Brothers of Bogota: I am a SUCKER for Twins Separated At Birth stories. I think this is the by-product of the fundamental loneliness of growing up as an Odd Kid. That, or maybe I had a secret twin my parents gave away. Who knows?  Anyway, I recently watched “Twinsters” on Netflix about separated-at-birth Korean twins, and it is a hopeful, heartbreaking, optimistic documentary that I strongly recommend. This NYT Magazine piece is a similar story from Bogota, discovered via Longform, and is also one of Longform’s best picks of 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/12/magazine/the-mixed-up-brothers-of-bogota.html

2) There Once Was Girl: Katy Waldman’s eating disorder narrative in Slate struck me for obvious reasons, and I particularly appreciated that it was not a recovery story that devolved into a How-To. Waldman also touches on a theme that I have struggled with lately – the Self as an Unreliable Narrator. I really loved this piece.

http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/cover_story/2015/12/we_need_to_reject_the_false_narratives_around_anorexia.html

3) The Keys to Enya’s Kingdom: I honestly have no idea why I loved this so much. I found this via Longform, and read it one night in the bath, which is where I typically catch up on my news from the day – 11pm in the bath (if you follow me on Instagram, you know this). My daylight hours are sucked up by reading reams of financial and regulatory news, so I have to get my weird cultural news fix in the bath.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/annehelenpetersen/the-keys-to-enyas-kingdom#.qgPxBAR83

4) Edna Lewis and the Black Roots of American Cooking: I’m a white woman interested in the ethics of food and cooking, and I need to constantly educate myself and understand how our meals evolve; where food and recipes come from.  In truth, very little of what we call “American” belongs to white folks. This is a beautiful tribute to Edna Lewis, and the forgotten/obscured contributions that black women have made to American cuisine

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/magazine/edna-lewis-and-the-black-roots-of-american-cooking.html

Stories by Me:

1) Monkey Suit: A story about monkeys, marriage, and grief.

2) Rebel without a Clue: A story about scrimshaw, and breaking points.

3) Our Wedding: An Explainer: A story about how people are assholes.

4) Low Bridge: A story about success, failure, becoming a New Yorker, and a mule named Sal.

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